Cranial Sutures: A Brief Review

@article{Slater2008CranialSA,
  title={Cranial Sutures: A Brief Review},
  author={B. Slater and K. Lenton and Matthew D. Kwan and Deepak M. Gupta and D. Wan and M. Longaker},
  journal={Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery},
  year={2008},
  volume={121},
  pages={170e-178e}
}
Summary: Craniosynostosis, or the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures, is a relatively common congenital defect that causes a number of morphologic and functional abnormalities. With advances in genetics and molecular biology, research of craniosynostosis has progressed from describing gross abnormalities to understanding the molecular interactions that underlie these cranial deformities. Animal models have been extremely valuable in improving our comprehension of human craniofacial… Expand
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TLDR
The intricate cellular and molecular interplay that exists within the suture among its three major components: dura mater, osteoblasticrelated molecular pathways and osteoclastic related molecular pathways is discussed. Expand
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TLDR
Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis, achieved through laboratory-based and clinical studies, has made the possibility of a non-surgical pharmacological approach both realistic and tangible. Expand
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TLDR
This chapter discusses the pathophysiology of craniosynostosis, specific suture involvement, diagnosis, surgical treatment options, and nursing care, as well as techniques to prevent or improve plagiocephaly. Expand
The Role of Regional Posterior Frontal Dura Mater in the Overlying Suture Morphology
TLDR
The posterior frontal–associated dura mater possesses potent, pro-osteogenic signals that influence the overlying suture fate, and the differential expression pattern of TGF-β signaling from thedura mater further supports the regional paracrine effect of the dURA mater. Expand
Craniosynostosis - Recognition, clinical characteristics, and treatment.
TLDR
Early diagnosis, expert surgical techniques, postoperative care, and adequate follow-up are of vital importance in treating craniosynostosis. Expand
Genetics of Crouzon Syndrome
TLDR
The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene is involved in the pathogenesis of Crouzon syndrome and belongs to a family of transmembrane tyrosine kinases and is located on10q26.13. Expand
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