Cranial Shape and the Modularity of Hybridization in Dingoes and Dogs; Hybridization Does Not Spell the End for Native Morphology

@article{Parr2016CranialSA,
  title={Cranial Shape and the Modularity of Hybridization in Dingoes and Dogs; Hybridization Does Not Spell the End for Native Morphology},
  author={William C H Parr and Laura A B Wilson and Stephen Wroe and Nicholas J. Colman and Mathew S. Crowther and Mike Letnic},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={43},
  pages={171-187}
}
Australia’s native wild dog, the dingo (Canis dingo), is threatened by hybridization with feral or domestic dogs. In this study we provide the first comprehensive three dimensional geometric morphometric evaluation of cranial shape for dingoes, dogs and their hybrids. We introduce a novel framework to assess whether modularity facilitates, or constrains, cranial shape change in hybridization. Our results show that hybrid and pure dingo morphology overlaps greatly, meaning that hybrids cannot be… 

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