Cranial Osteology of a Juvenile Specimen of Tarbosaurus bataar (Theropoda, Tyrannosauridae) from the Nemegt Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Bugin Tsav, Mongolia

@inproceedings{Tsuihiji2011CranialOO,
  title={Cranial Osteology of a Juvenile Specimen of Tarbosaurus bataar (Theropoda, Tyrannosauridae) from the Nemegt Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Bugin Tsav, Mongolia},
  author={Takanobu Tsuihiji and Mahito Watabe and Khishigjav Tsogtbaatar and Takehisa Tsubamoto and Rinchen Barsbold and Shigeru Suzuki and Andrew H Lee and Ryan C. Ridgely and Yasuhiro Kawahara and Lawrence M. Witmer},
  year={2011}
}
ABSTRACT A juvenile skull of the tyrannosaurid Tarbosaurus bataar found in the Bugjn Tsav locality in the Mongolian Gobi Desert is described. With a total length of 290 mm, the present specimen represents one of the smallest skulls known for this species. Not surprisingly, it shows various characteristics common to juvenile tyrannosaurids, such as the rostral margin of the maxillary fenestra not reaching that of the external antorbital fenestra and the postorbital lacking the cornual process… 
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