Cranial Mechanics and Functional Interpretation of the Horned Carnivorous Dinosaur Carnotaurus sastrei

@inproceedings{Mazzetta2009CranialMA,
  title={Cranial Mechanics and Functional Interpretation of the Horned Carnivorous Dinosaur Carnotaurus sastrei},
  author={Gerardo V. Mazzetta and Adri{\'a}n P. Cisilino and R. Ernesto Blanco and N. C. Calvo},
  year={2009}
}
ABSTRACT Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed on the cranium of the horned theropod Carnotaurus sastrei to assess how it would have performed mechanically during biting and frontal butting. This technique proved to be an effective tool to provide a better understanding of the cranial functional morphology of C. sastrei. The analyses indicated that the jaw-closing musculature of C. sastrei would have played a key role in diminishing the stress level on the cranium during… Expand
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