Cowbird parasitism of Pale-headed Brush-finch Atlapetes pallidiceps: implications for conservation and management

@article{Oppel2004CowbirdPO,
  title={Cowbird parasitism of Pale-headed Brush-finch Atlapetes pallidiceps: implications for conservation and management},
  author={Steffen Oppel and Hinrich Martin Schaefer and Veronika M. Schmidt and Boris Schr{\"o}der},
  journal={Bird Conservation International},
  year={2004},
  volume={14},
  pages={63 - 75}
}
Pale-headed Brush-finch Atlapetes pallidiceps is a restricted-range species that is threatened with extinction due to habitat loss. The total population of 60–80 individuals achieved a reproductive output of only 0.74 young per breeding pair in 2002. Brood parasitism by Shiny Cowbird Molothrus bonariensis was a major factor reducing breeding success, affecting 38.5% of broods. Parasitism rates reached 50% in an ungrazed reserve, but only 14% on an adjacent grazed plot. The resulting difference… 
Pale-headed Brush-finch Atlapetes pallidiceps: notes on population size, habitat, vocalizations, feeding, interference competition and conservation
  • N. Krabbe
  • Environmental Science
    Bird Conservation International
  • 2004
TLDR
Although habitat improved considerably between 1999 and 2002, some territories were vacant some years, and Shiny Cowbird Molothrus bonariensis parasitism was noted, and could be even more important than habitat as a limiting factor of the population size.
Impact of Shiny Cowbird and botfly parasitism on the reproductive success of the globally endangered Yellow Cardinal Gubernatrix cristata
TLDR
The results indicate that Shiny Cowbird and botfly parasitism represent a threat for Yellow Cardinals and conservation actions to protect the remaining populations of Yellow Cardinals should consider the impact of Shiny CowBird parasitism.
HOW MUCH SUITABLE HABITAT IS LEFT FOR THE LAST KNOWN POPULATION OF THE PALE-HEADED BRUSH-FINCH?
Abstract The Pale-headed Brush-Finch (Atlapetes pallidiceps) is threatened with extinction due to loss of habitat. The only remnant population consists of 30–35 pairs and is confined to a single
Brood parasitism leads to zero recruitment in the globally endangered Yellow CardinalGubernatrix cristata
TLDR
The reproductive success of a mixed population of released and wild Yellow Cardinals in La Pampa province, Argentina, during the reproductive season of 2019 was studied, finding the population was highly parasitized by the brood parasitic Shiny CowbirdMolothrus bonariensis.
Marked population increase in Pale-headed Brush-finch Atlapetes pallidiceps in response to cowbird control
TLDR
A marked increase in numbers of brush-finches is reported after seven years of cowbird control, confirming that brood parasitism had been an important limiting factor, and that shooting with firearms can be an effective method of controlling local cowbird parasitism.
The Brown-headed Cowbird: North America's avian brood parasite
TLDR
The Brown-headed Cowbird is a host generalist and is typically found in open habitats and forest edges and is one of the few brood parasitic species that is the subject of control programs to limit its effects on such hosts.
The Shiny Cowbird, Molothrus bonariensis (Gmelin, 1789) (Aves: Icteridae), at 2,800 m asl in Quito, Ecuador
TLDR
This report constitutes an altitudinal range expansion of reproductive populations of ca.
Does the removal of avian brood parasite eggs increase host productivity? A case study with brown-headed cowbirds Molothrus ater and song sparrows Melospiza melodia near Ithaca, New York, USA
TLDR
It is concluded that at this locality, conservation management to remove the eggs of brood parasitic brown-headed cow birds is unlikely to increase song sparrow productivity.
Decline in territory size and fecundity as a response to carrying capacity in an endangered songbird
TLDR
This study demonstrates that limiting resources can lead to individual adjustments instead of despotic behavior, and the individual reduction of reproductive output at high population densities is consistent with the slow life-history of many tropical species.
Cowbirds, conservation, and coevolution: potential misconceptions and directions for future research
TLDR
Concepts about the Brown-headed Cowbird, the most widely studied brood parasitic bird in the world, and its effects on host species are discussed and future research directions are suggested to enhance understanding of this fascinating species.
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