Covariation between brain size and immunity in birds: implications for brain size evolution

@article{Mller2005CovariationBB,
  title={Covariation between brain size and immunity in birds: implications for brain size evolution},
  author={A. M{\o}ller and J. Erritz{\o}e and L. Garamszegi},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={18}
}
Parasitism can negatively affect learning and cognition, setting the scene for coevolution between brain and immunity. Greater susceptibility to parasitism by males may impair their cognitive ability, and relatively greater male investment in immunity could compensate for greater susceptibility to parasites, in particular when males have a relatively large brain. We analysed covariation between relative size of immune defence organs and brain in juvenile and adult birds. The relative size of… Expand
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