Courvoisier’s Gallbladder: Law or Sign?

@article{Fitzgerald2008CourvoisiersGL,
  title={Courvoisier’s Gallbladder: Law or Sign?},
  author={James Edward Frankland Fitzgerald and Matthew J. White and Dileep N. Lobo},
  journal={World Journal of Surgery},
  year={2008},
  volume={33},
  pages={886-891}
}
BackgroundVariously described as Courvoisier’s law, sign, or even gallbladder, this eponymous “law” has been taught to medical students since the publication of Courvoisier’s treatise in 1890.MethodsWe reviewed Courvoisier’s original “law,” the modern misconceptions surrounding it, and the contemporary evidence supporting and explaining his observations.ResultsCourvoisier never stated a “law” in the context of a jaundiced patient with a palpable gallbladder. He described 187 cases of common… 
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