Coupling, Reinforcement, and Speciation

@article{Butlin2018CouplingRA,
  title={Coupling, Reinforcement, and Speciation},
  author={Roger K. Butlin and Carole M. Smadja},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2018},
  volume={191},
  pages={155 - 172}
}
During the process of speciation, populations may diverge for traits and at their underlying loci that contribute barriers to gene flow. These barrier traits and barrier loci underlie individual barrier effects, by which we mean the contribution that a barrier locus or trait—or some combination of barrier loci or traits—makes to overall isolation. The evolution of strong reproductive isolation typically requires the origin of multiple barrier effects. Critically, it also requires the… Expand

Topics from this paper

Consequences of coupled barriers to gene flow for the build-up of genomic differentiation
TLDR
This work analyzes patterns of gene exchange among populations of European corn borer moths that vary in the number of acting barriers, allowing for comparisons of genomic variation when barrier traits or loci are in coincident or independent states and finds that divergence is mainly restricted to barrier loci when populations differ by a single barrier. Expand
Towards the completion of speciation: the evolution of reproductive isolation beyond the first barriers
TLDR
It is suggested that more theoretical and empirical work, considering both patterns and processes associated with strong RI, is needed to understand how speciation is completed, and it is likely to involve different processes, or new interactions among processes, compared with the evolution of the first reproductive barriers. Expand
Transitions from Single- to Multi-Locus Processes during Speciation with Gene Flow
TLDR
Qualitatively, the patterns observed in the empirical data and in the simulations suggest that selection drives rapid genome-wide transitions to multi-locus coupling, illustrating how divergence and gene flow interact along the speciation continuum. Expand
A Darwinian Laboratory of Multiple Contact Zones.
TLDR
In a review of 23 marine species' genetic divergence over a postglacial salinity gradient, many showed steep genetic clines supported by divergent selection and/or temporal or spatial segregation. Expand
Reproductive isolation via polygenic local adaptation in sub-divided populations: effect of linkage disequilibria and drift
TLDR
The analysis clarifies how subpopulations belonging to a rare habitat can maintain local adaptation despite high levels of migration if net selection against multi-locus genotypes is stronger than a threshold which depends on the relative abundances of the two habitats. Expand
Inversions and genomic differentiation after secondary contact: When drift contributes to maintenance, not loss, of differentiation
TLDR
It is reported that finite population sizes can help counteract the homogenizing consequences of gene flux, especially when several fitness‐related loci reside within the inversion, and the persistence time of differentiation after secondary contact can be similar to when gene flux is absent and notably longer than the persistenceTime without inversions. Expand
Multiple forms of selection shape reproductive isolation in a primate hybrid zone
TLDR
The results reflect multiple forms of selection that have shaped reproductive isolation in this system, and conclude that reproductive isolation may have initially been driven by divergence in allopatry, but later reinforced by divergent selection in sympatry. Expand
Gene surfing of underdominant alleles promotes formation of hybrid zones
TLDR
This study model the establishment of clines that occur due to the surfing of underdominant alleles during range expansions and suggests that range expansions can set the stage for parapatric speciationdue to the alignment of multiple selective clines, even in the absence of ecologically divergent selection. Expand
Assessing the role of inversions in maintaining genomic differentiation after secondary contact: local adaptation, genetic incompatibilities, and drift
TLDR
It is reported that finite population sizes can help counteract the homogenizing consequences of gene flux, especially when several fitness-related loci reside within the inversion, and the persistence time of differentiation after secondary contact can be similar to when gene flux is absent, and notably longer than the persistenceTime without inversions. Expand
Heterospecific mating interactions as an interface between ecology and evolution
TLDR
An eco‐evolutionary perspective on reproductive interference is developed by integrating ecological and evolutionary processes in a common framework and a number of factors that are likely to influence the relative likelihoods of extinction or RCD are identified. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 119 REFERENCES
Hybridization and speciation
TLDR
A perspective on the context and evolutionary significance of hybridization during speciation is offered, highlighting issues of current interest and debate and suggesting that the Dobzhansky–Muller model of hybrid incompatibilities requires a broader interpretation. Expand
The origins of reproductive isolation in plants.
TLDR
Important questions for the next decade include identifying the evolutionary forces responsible for chromosomal rearrangements, determining how often prezygotic barriers arise due to selection against hybrids, and establishing the relative importance of genomic conflicts in speciation. Expand
Genome-Wide Congealing and Rapid Transitions across the Speciation Continuum during Speciation with Gene Flow.
TLDR
It is concluded with cautious optimism that the models and concepts discussed here, once extended to large numbers of neutral markers, may provide a framework for integrating information from genome scans, selection experiments, quantitative trait loci mapping, association studies, and natural history to develop a deeper understanding of the genomics of speciation. Expand
The coupling hypothesis: why genome scans may fail to map local adaptation genes
TLDR
It is argued that endogenous genetic barriers are often more likely than local adaptation to explain the majority of Fst‐outlying loci observed in genome scan approaches – even when these are correlated to environmental variables. Expand
Does hybridization influence speciation?
  • N. Barton
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of evolutionary biology
  • 2013
TLDR
The argument is really a rephrasing of the old arguments that gene flow across a broad two-dimensional habitat may hardly impede divergence, so that parapatric speciation is almost as easy as allopatric. Expand
The barrier to genetic exchange between hybridising populations
TLDR
In both cases, it is found that in order for gene flow to be significantly reduced over much of the genome, hybrids must be substantially less fit, and the number of genes involved in building the barrier must be so large that the majority of other genes become closely linked to some locus which is under selection. Expand
Divergent Outcomes of Reinforcement Speciation: The Relative Importance of Assortative Mating and Migration Modification
TLDR
The results reveal that assortative mating may evolve faster and under a broader range of biological conditions than migration modification, however, direct evolutionary interactions favor migration modification when populations experience strong divergent selection. Expand
Widespread genomic divergence during sympatric speciation
TLDR
Results highlight how the individual genes driving speciation can be embedded within an actively diverging genome, and illustrate how these continents can exhibit variable topography, depending on selection strength, availability of preexisting genetic variation, linkage relationships, and genomic features that reduce recombination. Expand
Reproductive isolation among allopatric Drosophila montana populations
TLDR
Investigation of barriers among allopatric populations of Drosophila montana found premating (sexual) isolation was particularly strong in crosses involving males from one of the study populations, and it was experimentally demonstrated that the majority of eggs produced were unfertilized. Expand
Speciation by Natural and Sexual Selection: Models and Experiments
TLDR
It is shown that the geographical context of speciation can be viewed as a form of assortative mating and this provides a framework for interpreting results from laboratory experiments, which are found to agree generally with theoretical predictions about conditions that are favorable to the evolution of prezygotic isolation. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...