Counting on neurons: the neurobiology of numerical competence

@article{Nieder2005CountingON,
  title={Counting on neurons: the neurobiology of numerical competence},
  author={Andreas Nieder},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={6},
  pages={177-190}
}
  • A. Nieder
  • Published 1 March 2005
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Numbers are an integral part of our everyday life — we use them to quantify, rank and identify objects. The verbal number concept allows humans to develop superior mathematical and logic skills that define technologically advanced cultures. However, basic numerical competence is rooted in biological primitives that can be explored in animals, infants and human adults alike. We are now beginning to unravel its anatomical basis and neuronal mechanisms on many levels, down to its single neuron… 
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