Counting Soviet Deaths in the Great Patriotic War: A Note

@article{Haynes2003CountingSD,
  title={Counting Soviet Deaths in the Great Patriotic War: A Note},
  author={Michael Haynes},
  journal={Europe-Asia Studies},
  year={2003},
  volume={55},
  pages={303 - 309}
}
(2003). Counting Soviet Deaths in the Great Patriotic War: A Note. Europe-Asia Studies: Vol. 55, No. 2, pp. 303-309. 
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