Counterfactuals: In reply to Alfred Bloom

@article{Au1984CounterfactualsIR,
  title={Counterfactuals: In reply to Alfred Bloom},
  author={T. Au},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={1984},
  volume={17},
  pages={289-302}
}
  • T. Au
  • Published 1984
  • Psychology
  • Cognition
  • Bloom (1981) hypothesized that the differences in counterfactual constructions in English and Chinese might affect native speakers’ inclination to think counterfactually. Because there is a distinct counterfactual construction (the subjunctive) in English but not in Chinese, Chinese sptakers might be less inclined than English speakers to think counterfactually. To test his hypothesis, or the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in general, Bloom prepared a story with several counterfactual implications, and… CONTINUE READING
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