Counterfactual thinking and the first instinct fallacy.

@article{Kruger2005CounterfactualTA,
  title={Counterfactual thinking and the first instinct fallacy.},
  author={J. Kruger and D. Wirtz and D. Miller},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={88 5},
  pages={
          725-35
        }
}
Most people believe that they should avoid changing their answer when taking multiple-choice tests. Virtually all research on this topic, however, has suggested that this strategy is ill-founded: Most answer changes are from incorrect to correct, and people who change their answers usually improve their test scores. Why do people believe in this strategy if the data so strongly refute it? The authors argue that the belief is in part a product of counterfactual thinking. Changing an answer when… Expand
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