Costs, benefits and the evolution of inducible defences: a case study with Daphnia pulex.

@article{Hammill2008CostsBA,
  title={Costs, benefits and the evolution of inducible defences: a case study with Daphnia pulex.},
  author={Edd Hammill and Angela Rogers and Andrew P Beckerman},
  journal={Journal of evolutionary biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={21 3},
  pages={705-15}
}
Phenotypic plasticity is one major source of variation in natural populations. Inducible defences, which can be considered threshold traits, are a form of plasticity that generates ecological and evolutionary consequences. A simple cost-benefit model underpins the maintenance and evolution of these threshold, inducible traits. In this model, a rank-order switch in expected fitness, defined by costs and benefits of induction between defended and undefended morphs, predicts the risk level at… CONTINUE READING