• Corpus ID: 15316275

Cost-effectiveness of exclusion fencing for stoat and other pest control compared with conventional control

@inproceedings{Clapperton2001CosteffectivenessOE,
  title={Cost-effectiveness of exclusion fencing for stoat and other pest control compared with conventional control},
  author={Barbara Kay Clapperton and Tim D. Day},
  year={2001}
}

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