Cost-effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy compared to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant severe depression: a decision model

@article{VallejoTorres2014CosteffectivenessOE,
  title={Cost-effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy compared to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant severe depression: a decision model},
  author={Laura Vallejo-Torres and Inmaculada Montoya Castilla and N. Gonz{\'a}lez and Rodney J. Hunter and Pedro Serrano-P{\'e}rez and Lilisbeth Perestelo-P{\'e}rez},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={45},
  pages={1459 - 1470}
}
Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is widely applied to treat severe depression resistant to standard treatment. Results from previous studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of this technique with treatment alternatives such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are conflicting. Method We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing ECT alone, rTMS alone and rTMS followed by ECT when rTMS fails under the perspective of the Spanish National Health Service. The… Expand
Cost–Utility Analysis of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Ontario
TLDR
From a societal perspective utilizing a lifetime horizon, rTMS is a cost-effective first-line treatment option for TRD relative to ECT, as it is less expensive and produces better health outcomes. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
In acute treatment of MDD, fourth-line ECT was the most cost-effective strategy and the value of neurostimulation therapies should be offered early in the process of managing depression. Expand
Evaluation of the Clinical Effectiveness of High Frequency Left Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) versus Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in the Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD)
Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent, persistent, and disabling mental illness. Statistically, the lifetime prevalence of depression is 17%, but only 6% of those living withExpand
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TLDR
In conclusions, ECT could reduce the rate of hospitalization and number of emergency department visits in patients with treatment-resistant depressive disorders, however, the study results might be biased by the inherent deficits of mirror-image design. Expand
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Bifrontal ECT is not more effective than BT or RUL ECT but may have modest short-term benefits for specific memory domains and BF ECT has potential advantages, but given longer experience with BT and RUL, bif prefrontal ECT requires better characterization. Expand
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