Cost-effectiveness as a guide in developing indexing rules

@article{Schultz1970CosteffectivenessAA,
  title={Cost-effectiveness as a guide in developing indexing rules},
  author={Claire K. Schultz},
  journal={Inf. Storage Retr.},
  year={1970},
  volume={6},
  pages={335-340}
}
4 Citations

TOWARDS AUTOMATIC INDEXING: AUTOMATIC ASSIGNMENT OF CONTROLLED‐LANGUAGE INDEXING AND CLASSIFICATION FROM FREE INDEXING

TLDR
The accuracy and cost‐effectiveness of the automatically‐assigned subject headings and classifications has been compared with that of the manual system and the results were encouraging and the costs comparable to those of a manual system.

A Cost Effectiveness Model for Comparing Various Circulation Systems

TLDR
Two models for circulation systems costing are presented and use of the models for cost effectiveness comparison and for cost prediction are discussed and examples are given showing their application.

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