Cost Analysis of Maternal Disease Associated With Suboptimal Breastfeeding

@article{Bartick2013CostAO,
  title={Cost Analysis of Maternal Disease Associated With Suboptimal Breastfeeding},
  author={Melissa Bartick and Alison M. Stuebe and Eleanor Bimla Schwarz and C Luongo and Arnold G. Reinhold and E. Michael Foster},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={122},
  pages={111–119}
}
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the U.S. maternal health burden from current breastfeeding rates both in terms of premature death as well as economic costs. METHODS: Using literature on associations between lactation and maternal health, we modeled the health outcomes and costs expected for a U.S. cohort of 15-year-old females followed to age 70 years. In 2002, this cohort included 1.88 million individuals. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compared the outcomes expected if 90% of mothers were able to… 
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