Cost‐effectiveness of misoprostol to control postpartum hemorrhage in low‐resource settings

@article{Bradley2007CosteffectivenessOM,
  title={Cost‐effectiveness of misoprostol to control postpartum hemorrhage in low‐resource settings},
  author={Sarah E. Bradley and Ndola Prata and Nichole Young-Lin and David Bishai},
  journal={International Journal of Gynecology \& Obstetrics},
  year={2007},
  volume={97}
}
Objective: To test the cost‐effectiveness of training traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to recognize postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and administer a rectal dose of misoprostol in areas with low access to modern delivery facilities. Method: A cost‐effectiveness analysis, modeling two hypothetical cohorts of 10,000 women each giving birth with TBAs: one under standard treatment (TBA referral to hospital after blood loss ≥ 500 ml), and one attended by TBAs trained to recognize PPH and to administer… Expand
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TLDR
Prenatal distribution of misoprostol is potentially cost-effective in Uganda and should be considered for national-level scale up for prevention of PPH. Expand
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TLDR
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The wide gap in maternal mortality ratios worldwide indicates major inequities in the levels of risk women face during pregnancy. Two priority strategies have emerged among safe motherhood advocates:Expand
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TLDR
The results suggest carbetocin, oxytocin and ‘ergometrine plus Oxytocin’ could all be favourable options for being the most cost-effective strategy for preventing postpartum haemorrhage. Expand
Advance misoprostol distribution for preventing and treating postpartum haemorrhage.
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TLDR
The most effective and cost-effective uterotonic drug(s) to prevent PPH were identified and a ranking according to their effectiveness and side-effect profile was generated, and ergometrine plus oxytocin was ranked fourth, with almost 0% cumulative probability of being ranked in the top three. Expand
Feasibility, Acceptability, and Programme Effectiveness of Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage in Rural Bangladesh: A Quasiexperimental Study
TLDR
This study has demonstrated community acceptability to misoprostol tablets for the prevention of PPH that reduced overall volume of blood loss after childbirth and the delivery mat and pad were found to be useful to mothers as tools for assessing the amount ofBlood loss after delivery and informing care-seeking decisions. Expand
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References

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TLDR
Misoprostol is a low cost, easy to use technology that can control PPH even without a medically trained attendant. Expand
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TLDR
Misoprostol administered as a micro‐enema, 400 μg in 5 ml of saline during the third stage of labor, appears to be as effective as oxytocin 10 IU, i.m., but misop Frostol produced more side effects than oxytoc in a double blind, randomized, clinical trial. Expand
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TLDR
The aim of this review was to determine the route of administration and dosage of misoprostol most likely to be effective in the treatment of PPH and identify randomised controlled trials that compared misop frostol with any appropriate control groups. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
New strategies to prevent and manage postpartum hemorrhage in developing countries, such as community-based use of misoprostol, oxytocin in the Uniject delivery system, the non-inflatable antishock garment to stabilize and resuscitate hypovolemic shock, and the balloon condom catheter to treat intractable uterine bleeding are reviewed. Expand
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TLDR
A multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial to determine whether oral misoprostol is as effective as oxytocin during the third stage of labour and the use of additional uterotonics without an unacceptable level of side-effects. Expand
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TLDR
This randomised controlled trial compared misoprostol 600 μg (200 μg orally and 400 μg sublingually) with placebo in the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage in addition to routine treatment. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Rectal misoprostol is of equivalent efficacy to parenteral oxytocin for the prevention of primary postpartum hemorrhage and is an appropriate uterotonic agent for routine management of the third stage of labour. Expand
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