Cosmopolitanism among Gondwanan Late Cretaceous mammals

@article{Krause1997CosmopolitanismAG,
  title={Cosmopolitanism among Gondwanan Late Cretaceous mammals},
  author={David W. Krause and Guntupalli V. R. Prasad and Wighart Von Koenigswald and Ashok Sahni and Frederick E. Grine},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={390},
  pages={504-507}
}
Consistent with geophysical evidence for the breaking up of Pangaea, it has been hypothesized that Cretaceous vertebrates on progressively isolated landmasses exhibit generally increasing levels of provincialism, with distinctly heightened endemism occurring at the beginning of the Late Cretaceous. The Cretaceous fossil record from the southern supercontinent of Gondwana has been much too poor to test this hypothesis with regards to mammals (Fig. 1 ). Early Cretaceous mammals are known only… 
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