Cosmic star formation history and AGN evolution near and far: from AKARI to SPICA

@article{Goto2012CosmicSF,
  title={Cosmic star formation history and AGN evolution near and far: from AKARI to SPICA},
  author={Tomotsugu Goto and Akari Nep team and Akari all sky survey team},
  journal={arXiv: Astrophysics of Galaxies},
  year={2012}
}
Infrared (IR) luminosity is fundamental to understanding the cosmic star formation history and AGN evolution, since their most intense stages are often obscured by dust. Japanese infrared satellite, AKARI, provided unique data sets to probe these both at low and high redshifts. The AKARI performed an all sky survey in 6 IR bands (9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160$\mu$m) with 3-10 times better sensitivity than IRAS, covering the crucial far-IR wavelengths across the peak of the dust emission. Combined… Expand

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