Cortisol concentrations and the social significance of rank instability among wild baboons

@article{Sapolsky1992CortisolCA,
  title={Cortisol concentrations and the social significance of rank instability among wild baboons},
  author={Robert Morris Sapolsky},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={1992},
  volume={17},
  pages={701-709}
}
  • R. Sapolsky
  • Published 1 November 1992
  • Psychology
  • Psychoneuroendocrinology
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Stress hormones and social behavior of wolves in Yellowstone National Park
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  • R. Sapolsky
  • Psychology
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TLDR
Elevated testosterone and high levels of aggression were unrelated to social status during the period of social stability, but were traits associated with dominant individuals during the unstable period.
Biochemical and hormonal correlates of dominance and social behavior in all‐male groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
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