Cortical Excitation and Inhibition following Focal Traumatic Brain Injury

@article{Ding2011CorticalEA,
  title={Cortical Excitation and Inhibition following Focal Traumatic Brain Injury},
  author={M. Ding and Q. Wang and E. Lo and G. B. Stanley},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2011},
  volume={31},
  pages={14085 - 14094}
}
Cortical compression can be a significant problem in many types of brain injuries, such as brain trauma, localized brain edema, hematoma, focal cerebral ischemia, or brain tumors. Mechanical and cellular alterations can result in global changes in excitation and inhibition on the neuronal network level even in the absence of histologically significant cell injury, often manifesting clinically as seizures. Despite the importance and prevalence of this problem, however, the precise… Expand
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