Correlates of horn and antler shape in bovids and cervids

@article{Caro2003CorrelatesOH,
  title={Correlates of horn and antler shape in bovids and cervids},
  author={Tim Caro and C. M. Graham and Chantal J. Stoner and M. Montemayor Flores},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={55},
  pages={32-41}
}
Using analyses that control for phylogeny, we examine whether the shapes of horns and antlers in ungulates are related to style of fighting, environmental factors, mating and social systems, or are simply arbitrary. Many of the predictions that relate horn shape to species' fighting tactics and to their mating and social systems are supported. Bovids with tips facing inwards are likely to wrestle with their horns, be monogamous and solitary, whereas those with tips facing out tend to be… 

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