Correlated pay-offs are key to cooperation

@article{Taborsky2016CorrelatedPA,
  title={Correlated pay-offs are key to cooperation},
  author={Michael Taborsky and Joachim G. Frommen and Christina Riehl},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={371}
}
The general belief that cooperation and altruism in social groups result primarily from kin selection has recently been challenged, not least because results from cooperatively breeding insects and vertebrates have shown that groups may be composed mainly of non-relatives. This allows testing predictions of reciprocity theory without the confounding effect of relatedness. Here, we review complementary and alternative evolutionary mechanisms to kin selection theory and provide empirical examples… Expand
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