Correction: Family Poverty Affects the Rate of Human Infant Brain Growth

@article{Hanson2015CorrectionFP,
  title={Correction: Family Poverty Affects the Rate of Human Infant Brain Growth},
  author={Jamie Lars Hanson and Nicole L Hair and Dinggang Shen and Feng Shi and John H. Gilmore and Barbara L. Wolfe and Seth D. Pollak},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2015},
  volume={10}
}
In Figs ​Figs2,2, ​,33 and ​and44 of the published article the units of volume are incorrectly noted as cm3. The correct units are mm3. Fig 2 This figure shows total gray matter volume for group by age. Fig 3 This figure shows frontal lobe gray matter volumes for group by age. Fig 4 This figure shows parietal lobe gray matter volumes for group by age. 
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Family Poverty Affects the Rate of Human Infant Brain Growth
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Differences in brain growth were found to vary with socioeconomic status (SES), with children from lower-income households having slower trajectories of growth during infancy and early childhood.
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