Coronavirus Diversity, Phylogeny and Interspecies Jumping

@article{Woo2009CoronavirusDP,
  title={Coronavirus Diversity, Phylogeny and Interspecies Jumping},
  author={Patrick C. Y. Woo and Susanna K. P. Lau and Yi Huang and Kwok Yung Yuen},
  journal={Experimental Biology and Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={234},
  pages={1117 - 1127}
}
  • P. Woo, S. Lau, +1 author K. Yuen
  • Published 2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Experimental Biology and Medicine
The SARS epidemic has boosted interest in research on coronavirus biodiversity and genomics. Before 2003, there were only 10 coronaviruses with complete genomes available. After the SARS epidemic, up to December 2008, there was an addition of 16 coronaviruses with complete genomes sequenced. These include two human coronaviruses (human coronavirus NL63 and human coronavirus HKU1), 10 other mammalian coronaviruses [bat SARS coronavirus, bat coronavirus (bat-CoV) HKU2, bat-CoV HKU4, bat-CoV HKU5… Expand
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