Cornell scale for depression in dementia

@article{Alexopoulos1988CornellSF,
  title={Cornell scale for depression in dementia},
  author={George S. Alexopoulos and Robert C. Abrams and R. C. Young and Charles A. Shamoian},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={1988},
  volume={23},
  pages={271-284}
}

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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) are both valid screening tools for depression in the elderly; however, the CSDD alone seems to be equally valid in populations of demented and non-demented.

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  • A. ShahT. Gray
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of geriatric psychiatry
  • 1997
The performance of the Depressive Signs Scale (DSS), completed by the nursing staff, in detecting significant clinical depression among continuing care psychogeriatric inpatients was examined. A

Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia: Study of Residents in a Northern Thai Long-Term Care Home

TLDR
The validity of the Thai version of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) when using DSM-IV criteria is found to be better for the group experiencing cognitive impairment than with the non-cognitive impairment group in terms of the agreement of CSDD items between patients and caregivers.

Use of the Cornell Scale in Nondemented Patients

TLDR
The Cornell scale is the only depression‐rating instrument that has been validated in both demented and nondemented geriatric subjects and had high interrater reliability, internal consistency, and sensitivity.

Depression in Persons With Dementia

TLDR
It is suggested that clinically significant depression in dementia is less common than previously reported and tends to remit, and rates and levels of depression tended to be higher in vascular than in Alzheimer's dementia according to the rating scales, but notaccording to the DSM-IV criteria.
...

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