Corneal ectasia induced by laser in situ keratomileusis

@article{Pallikaris2001CornealEI,
  title={Corneal ectasia induced by laser in situ keratomileusis},
  author={Ioannis G. Pallikaris and George D Kymionis and Nikolaos Astyrakakis},
  journal={Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery},
  year={2001},
  volume={27},
  pages={1796–1802}
}
Purpose: To identify factors that can lead to corneal ectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Setting: University refractive surgery center. Methods: In this retrospective study, the charts of all patients (2873 eyes) who had LASIK between May 1995 and November 1999 were reviewed. Fourteen patients (19 eyes, 0.66%) developed post‐LASIK ectasia. The mean follow‐up was 16.32 months (range 6 to 42 months). Results: No patient with an attempted correction less than 8.00 diopters or a… 
Analysis of ectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis: Risk factors
  • P. Binder
  • Medicine
    Journal of cataract and refractive surgery
  • 2007
TLDR
Unmeasured and unknown factors that affect the individual cornea's biomechanical stability, in combination with some suspected risk factors as well as the current inability to identify corneas at risk for developing ectatic disorders, probably account for most eyes that develop ectasia today.
Corneal ectasia after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: a long-term study
TLDR
Ectasia was an uncommon outcome after an otherwise uncomplicated laser in situ keratomileusis procedure and the variables present in eyes developing postoperative LASIK ectasia can be better understood using the Randleman Ectasia Risk Score System.
Progressive keratectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis.
TLDR
Progressive keratectasia is a vision threatening complication of LASIK that may occur in previously healthy or diseased eyes and the most important risk factors are residual stromal thickness and preexisting abnormal corneal topography.
Accelerated corneal crosslinking concurrent with laser in situ keratomileusis
TLDR
Laser in situ keratomileusis with accelerated CXL appears to be a promising modality for future applications to prevent corneal ectasia after LASIK treatment, and results in this pilot series suggest that evaluation of a larger study cohort is warranted.
Corneal Ectasia Risk And Percentage Tissue Altered In Myopic Patients Presenting For Refractive Surgery
Purpose A percentage tissue altered (PTA) score of ≥40% has been advocated as an independent indicator of post-operative ectasia risk following laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK). This study was
Residual bed thickness and corneal forward shift after laser in situ keratomileusis
TLDR
O Eyes with thin corneas and high myopia requiring greater laser ablation are more predisposed to an anterior shift of the cornea after LASIK, even if a residual corneal bed of 300 &mgr;m or thicker is preserved.
Long term changes of posterior corneal elevation after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis
TLDR
The present study identified a significant forward shift of the posterior cornea 6 years after LASIK, and indicated that the ablation spherical equivalent (ASE) was the most significant prognostic determinant for forward protrusion of the anterior cornea after L ASIK.
Risk factors for corneal ectasia after LASIK.
TLDR
A risk score may help in the prediction of patients who are at risk of experiencing corneal ectasia after LASIK and a prospective clinical study is needed to assess the validity of these risk factors.
Intrastromal corneal ring segment implantation for ectasia after refractive surgery
TLDR
IntrastromalCorneal ring segment implantation significantly improved UDVA and CDVA in patients with corneal ectasia.
Superficial corneal crosslinking during laser in situ keratomileusis
TLDR
Based on 1‐year results, superficial corneal crosslinking might be considered a safe adjunct to LASIK, with a delayed visual rehabilitation and a higher prevalence of transient side effects.
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TLDR
It is recommended that LASIK be restricted to cases in which more than half the original corneal thickness and more than 250 microns of the stromal bed can be preserved, and careful examination, including preoperative serial topographic evaluation and measurement of posteriorStromal thickness, should be performed to improve the quality and predictability of cornean refractive surgery.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
A new laser refractive procedure is being developed in a rabbit model that might induce stable corneal changes because of the preservation of the anterior layers of the cornea.
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