Coral larvae settle at a higher frequency on red surfaces

@article{Mason2011CoralLS,
  title={Coral larvae settle at a higher frequency on red surfaces},
  author={Benjamin M. Mason and M. Beard and M. W. Miller},
  journal={Coral Reefs},
  year={2011},
  volume={30},
  pages={667-676}
}
Although chemical cues serve as the primary determinants of larval settlement and metamorphosis, light is also known to influence the behavior and the settlement of coral planulae. For example, Porites astreoides planulae settle preferentially on unconditioned red substrata. In order to test whether this behavior was a response to color and whether other species also demonstrate color preference, settlement choice experiments were conducted with P. astreoides and Acropora palmata. In these… 

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It is proposed that the perception of specific visual signals can be involved in behavior of zooplankton including marine invertebrate larvae, and that barnacle auto-fluorescence may be a specific signal involved in gregarious larval settlement.
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