Coral Reef Fish Larvae Settle Close to Home

@article{Jones2005CoralRF,
  title={Coral Reef Fish Larvae Settle Close to Home},
  author={Geoffrey P. Jones and S. Planes and S. Thorrold},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={15},
  pages={1314-1318}
}
Population connectivity through larval dispersal is an essential parameter in models of marine population dynamics and the optimal size and spacing of marine reserves. However, there are remarkably few direct estimates of larval dispersal for marine organisms, and the actual birth sites of successful recruits have never been located. Here, we solve the mystery of the natal origin of clownfish (Amphiprion polymnus) juveniles by mass-marking via tetracycline immersion all larvae produced in a… Expand
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