Copyright Contradictions in Scholarly Publishing

@article{Willinsky2002CopyrightCI,
  title={Copyright Contradictions in Scholarly Publishing},
  author={John Willinsky},
  journal={First Monday},
  year={2002},
  volume={7}
}
  • John Willinsky
  • Published 2002
  • Computer Science, Political Science
  • First Monday
  • This paper examines contradictions in how copyright works with the publishing of scholarly journals. These contradictions have to do with the protection of the authors' interest and have become apparent with the rise of open access publishing as an alternative to the traditional commercial model of selling journal subscriptions. Authors may well be better served, as may the public which supports research, by open access journals because of its wider readership and early indications of greater… CONTINUE READING

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    Who Should Own Scientific Papers?

    Free Software/Free Science

    11 Freedom of information may be accompanied by a fee, depending on the use to which it is to be put, with educational uses usually held only to duplication costs

    • 11 Freedom of information may be accompanied by a fee, depending on the use to which it is to be put, with educational uses usually held only to duplication costs