Copyright Contradictions in Scholarly Publishing

@article{Willinsky2002CopyrightCI,
  title={Copyright Contradictions in Scholarly Publishing},
  author={John M Willinsky},
  journal={First Monday},
  year={2002},
  volume={7}
}
This paper examines contradictions in how copyright works with the publishing of scholarly journals. These contradictions have to do with the protection of the authors' interest and have become apparent with the rise of open access publishing as an alternative to the traditional commercial model of selling journal subscriptions. Authors may well be better served, as may the public which supports research, by open access journals because of its wider readership and early indications of greater… 
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This review aims to be a resource for current knowledge on the impacts of Open Access by synthesizing important research in three major areas: academic, economic and societal.
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