Copyleft: Licensing collaborative works in the digital age

@article{Heffan1997CopyleftLC,
  title={Copyleft: Licensing collaborative works in the digital age},
  author={I. Heffan},
  journal={Stanford Law Review},
  year={1997},
  volume={49},
  pages={1487-1521}
}
  • I. Heffan
  • Published 1997
  • Business
  • Stanford Law Review
Authors who wish to dedicate their works to the public may think they have no need for copyright or other intellectual property rights. However, if subsequent authors make contributions to an original author's work, those subsequent authors might be entitled to assert proprietary rights in their contributions, thereby defeating the intent of the original author to dedicate his work to the public. The GNU Project is a worldwide collaborative effort to develop high quality software and make it… Expand
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References

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