Copiousness, conjecture and collaboration in William Camden's Britannia

@article{Vine2014CopiousnessCA,
  title={Copiousness, conjecture and collaboration in William Camden's Britannia},
  author={Angus Vine},
  journal={Renaissance Studies},
  year={2014},
  volume={28}
}
  • Angus Vine
  • Published 1 April 2014
  • History, Art
  • Renaissance Studies
While William Camden's Britannia (1586) clearly is a copious text in both the Renaissance sense of the word and its modern meaning, the work's connection with the humanist rhetorical tradition of copia is far from straightforward. Camden focuses in this monumental antiquarian survey of Britain on copia rerum rather than copia verborum, thus adopting one half of the humanist concept, but essentially dispensing with the other. This new kind of copiousness, the article argues, is the consequence… 

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References

SHOWING 1-5 OF 5 REFERENCES

The Library of William Camden

  • Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society
  • 1984

Britain (1610), 644; and

    For an overview of James's moderate politics, and the irenic and ecumenical ideas behind them, see

      shelf mark Bn1-b.1, H1r. The same reader was equally exercised by Camden's arguments about the Picts, dismissing them as 'mendacium insigne' (G5v) and 'mendacium egregium

        K2r and K4r; and Camden