Coping strategies in patients with acquired brain injury: relationships between coping, apathy, depression and lesion location

@article{Andersson2000CopingSI,
  title={Coping strategies in patients with acquired brain injury: relationships between coping, apathy, depression and lesion location},
  author={Arnstein Finset, Stein Andersson},
  journal={Brain Injury},
  year={2000},
  volume={14},
  pages={887 - 905}
}
Coping strategies in individuals suffering severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), or hypoxic brain injury (HBI) were investigated in relation to apathy, depression, and lesion location. Seventy patients (27 with TBI, 30 with CVA, and 13 with HBI) filled in a coping questionnaire (COPE) and were evaluated with respect to apathy and depression. A comparison sample of 71 students also filled in COPE. Patients coping strategies were similar to the comparison group… 
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