Coping among african-american, hispanic, and non-hispanic white women recently treated for early stage breast cancer

@article{Culver2004CopingAA,
  title={Coping among african-american, hispanic, and non-hispanic white women recently treated for early stage breast cancer},
  author={Jenifer L. Culver and Patricia L. Arena and Sarah R. Wimberly and Michael H Antoni and Charles S Carver},
  journal={Psychology \& Health},
  year={2004},
  volume={19},
  pages={157 - 166}
}
Relatively little is known about how members of minority groups cope with experiences such as diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer – in particular, whether coping patterns among minorities differ from that of the majority. This study adds to the existing knowledge base using a cross-sectional sample of middle-class African-American (n = 26), Hispanic (n = 59), and non-Hispanic White women (n = 151) who had been treated for early stage breast cancer in the past year. We tested for… Expand
"God will get me through": African American women coping with breast cancer and implications for support groups.
This research examines the coping processes of African American women with breast cancer and how those processes relate to low usage of cancer support groups by these women. Prior coping research hasExpand
Breast cancer and coping among women of color: a systematic review of the literature
TLDR
What is known about coping with breast cancer among racial/ethnic minority women and what are the strengths and gaps in research to date are elucidated. Expand
Cancer Outcomes in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: An Integrative Review and Conceptual Model of Determinants of Health.
TLDR
A conceptual model is presented that highlights the interplay of social, cultural, psychosocial, disease-specific, health care, and medical factors as determinants of cancer outcomes (morbidity, mortality, quality of life) and key evidence of how features of Hispanic culture may influence cancer outcomes and contribute to the disparate outcomes observed in Hispanic cancer samples relative to non-Hispanic Whites is reviewed. Expand
Coping with breast cancer: Reflections from Chinese American, Korean American, and Mexican American women.
TLDR
Benefit finding was the most referenced coping strategy, whereas religious/spiritual coping was most frequently reported among Korean American and Mexican American BCS. Expand
The psychosocial impact of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment in Black and South Asian women
TLDR
The results from this study show that psychological distress, social support and receiving chemotherapy treatment are associated with quality of life and similarities and differences in Black, South Asian and White women’s breast cancer experiences are evident. Expand
Psychosocial Responses to Treatment for Breast Cancer Among Lesbian and Heterosexual Women
TLDR
Compared to the heterosexual women, lesbians reported less thought avoidance, lower levels of sexual concern, less concern about their appearance, and less disruption in sexual activity, but also substantially lower perceptions of benefit from having had cancer. Expand
Rural breast cancer patients, coping and depressive symptoms: A prospective comparison study
TLDR
The results revealed that the rurality of breast cancer patients was unrelated to the ways in which they coped, but did influence the relationships between some coping responses and depressive symptoms. Expand
Mental Health Treatment Involvement and Religious Coping among African American, Hispanic, and White Veterans of the Wars of Iraq and Afghanistan
TLDR
After controlling for PTSD symptoms, depression symptom level was a significant predictor of psychotherapy attendance but not medication treatment, and religious coping was associated with participation in religious counseling, but not secular mental health services. Expand
Mental Health Treatment Involvement and Religious Coping among African American , Hispanic , andWhite Veterans of theWars of Iraq and Afghanistan
Although racial/ethnic differences have been found in the use of mental health services for depression in the general population, research among Veterans has produced mixed results. This studyExpand
Emotions and Coping Strategies During Breast Cancer in Latina Women: A Focus Group Study
TLDR
It is recommended that future studies contextualize Latina women’s emotional experiences and coping skills associated with BC as indicators of well-being and highlight the importance of developing culturally appropriate interventions. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES
Coping and distress among women under treatment for early stage breast cancer: comparing african americans, hispanics and non‐hispanic whites
TLDR
Findings point to a great many similarities across groups as well as evidence of a maladaptive spiral of distress and avoidant coping over time in women with early stage breast cancer. Expand
Depression and coping in candidates for kidney transplantation: Racial and ethnic differences
TLDR
Results indicated that Hispanic and Black subjects were more likely to use maladaptive styles of coping and less likely toUse adaptive coping than were White subjects and that Black subjects reported more physical symptoms of depression. Expand
Racial, ethnic, and cultural differences in the dementia caregiving experience: recent findings.
TLDR
Findings were mixed regarding differences in coping and social support, but suggested that minority groups may not have more available support than Whites, and should expand their focus beyond the primary caregiver to include the effects of caregiving on families and networks. Expand
The relationships of cognitive coping and pain control beliefs to pain and adjustment among African-American and Caucasian women with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • M. Jordan, M. Lumley, J. Leisen
  • Medicine
  • Arthritis care and research : the official journal of the Arthritis Health Professions Association
  • 1998
TLDR
There are ethnic differences in the use of coping strategies that should be acknowledged when helping RA patients cope with their disease, but control beliefs and several coping strategies predict pain and adjustment, regardless of ethnicity. Expand
Racial, ethnic, and cultural differences in dementia caregiving: review and analysis.
TLDR
Compared to White caregivers, non-White caregivers were less likely to be a spouse and morelikely to be an adult child, friend, or other family member, and were more likely to use prayer, faith, or religion as coping mechanisms. Expand
Differences in Young Adolescents' Coping Strategies Based On Gender and Ethnicity
The differences in young adolescent coping responses were investigated to determine whether their reported differences in strategies would vary by gender and/or ethnicity (Anglo or Hispanic). TwoExpand
Differences in religiousness among black and white women with breast cancer.
  • J. Bourjolly
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Social work in health care
  • 1998
TLDR
Findings suggest that black women rely on religiousness as a coping resource to a greater extent than white women with breast cancer. Expand
Stress, coping, and Black mental health: preliminary findings from a national study.
TLDR
The analysis indicates that prayer was an extremely important coping response used by blacks especially among those making less than $10,000, above the age of 55 and women, and the informal social network was used quite extensively as a means of coping with problems. Expand
Patterns of coping with cancer.
TLDR
Coping through social support, focusing on the positive, and distancing was associated with less emotional distress, whereas using cognitive and behavioral escape-avoidance wasassociated with more emotional distress. Expand
Coping with a breast cancer diagnosis: a prospective study.
  • A. Stanton, P. Snider
  • Medicine
  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
  • 1993
TLDR
This study followed 117 women age 40 or over regarding personality, cognitive appraisal, coping, and mood variables before breast biopsy, after diagnosis, and, for those who had cancer, after surgery. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...