Cooperative hunting and group size: assumptions and currencies

@article{Creel1997CooperativeHA,
  title={Cooperative hunting and group size: assumptions and currencies},
  author={Scott R. Creel},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={54},
  pages={1319-1324}
}
  • S. Creel
  • Published 1 November 1997
  • Medicine, Economics
  • Animal Behaviour
No abstractCopyright 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour 
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