Cooperative breeding in carrion crows reduces the rate of brood parasitism by great spotted cuckoos

@article{Canestrari2009CooperativeBI,
  title={Cooperative breeding in carrion crows reduces the rate of brood parasitism by great spotted cuckoos},
  author={Daniela Canestrari and J. Martin Marcos and Vittorio Baglione},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={77},
  pages={1337-1344}
}

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