Cooperative breeding beyond kinship: why else do helpers help?

@article{McDonald2014CooperativeBB,
  title={Cooperative breeding beyond kinship: why else do helpers help?},
  author={P. McDonald},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2014},
  volume={114},
  pages={91 - 96}
}
  • P. McDonald
  • Published 2014
  • Biology
  • Emu - Austral Ornithology
  • One of themost widely studied forms of cooperative behaviour is the phenomenon of cooperative breeding, where ‘helpers’ care for young that are not their own (Cockburn 1998; Pacheco et al. 2008). Cooperative systems are present in taxa as diverse as slime mould, eusocial insects and a broad-range of vertebrates, including mammals, fish, reptiles and birds (Queller and Strassmann 1998; Clutton-Brock 2002; Mehdiabadi et al. 2006). Fittingly, a large body of research has been devoted to… CONTINUE READING
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