Cooperation between non-relatives in a primitively eusocial paper wasp, Polistes dominula

@article{Field2016CooperationBN,
  title={Cooperation between non-relatives in a primitively eusocial paper wasp, Polistes dominula},
  author={Jeremy Field and Ellouise Leadbeater},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={371}
}
  • J. Field, E. Leadbeater
  • Published 5 February 2016
  • Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
In cooperatively breeding vertebrates, the existence of individuals that help to raise the offspring of non-relatives is well established, but unrelated helpers are less well known in the social insects. Eusocial insect groups overwhelmingly consist of close relatives, so populations where unrelated helpers are common are intriguing. Here, we focus on Polistes dominula—the best-studied primitively eusocial wasp, and a species in which nesting with non-relatives is not only present but frequent… 

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