Cooperation and competition in pathogenic bacteria

@article{Griffin2004CooperationAC,
  title={Cooperation and competition in pathogenic bacteria},
  author={Ashleigh S. Griffin and Stuart Andrew West and Angus Buckling},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={430},
  pages={1024-1027}
}
Explaining altruistic cooperation is one of the greatest challenges for evolutionary biology. One solution to this problem is if costly cooperative behaviours are directed towards relatives. This idea of kin selection has been hugely influential and applied widely from microorganisms to vertebrates. However, a problem arises if there is local competition for resources, because this leads to competition between relatives, reducing selection for cooperation. Here we use an experimental evolution… 
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