Convex hull and tour crossings in the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem: Implications for human performance studies

@article{Rooij2003ConvexHA,
  title={Convex hull and tour crossings in the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem: Implications for human performance studies},
  author={Iris van Rooij and Ulrike Stege and Alissa Schactman},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={2003},
  volume={31},
  pages={215-220}
}
Recently there has been growing interest among psychologists in human performance on the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem (E-TSP). A debate has been initiated on what strategy people use in solving visually presented E-TSP instances. The most prominent hypothesis is the convex-hull hypothesis, originally proposed by MacGregor and Ormerod (1996). We argue that, in the literature so far, there is no evidence for this hypothesis. Alternatively we propose and motivate the hypothesis that… 
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TLDR
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