Conversations with Lewis R. Binford on historical archaeology

@article{Thurman1998ConversationsWL,
  title={Conversations with Lewis R. Binford on historical archaeology},
  author={Melburn D. Thurman},
  journal={Historical Archaeology},
  year={1998},
  volume={32},
  pages={28-55}
}
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