Convergent evolution, habitat shifts and variable diversification rates in the ovenbird-woodcreeper family (Furnariidae)

@article{Irestedt2009ConvergentEH,
  title={Convergent evolution, habitat shifts and variable diversification rates in the ovenbird-woodcreeper family (Furnariidae)},
  author={Martin Irestedt and Jon Fjelds{\aa} and Love Dal{\'e}n and Per G. P. Ericson},
  journal={BMC Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={9},
  pages={268 - 268}
}
BackgroundThe Neotropical ovenbird-woodcreeper family (Furnariidae) is an avian group characterized by exceptionally diverse ecomorphological adaptations. For instance, members of the family are known to construct nests of a remarkable variety. This offers a unique opportunity to examine whether changes in nest design, accompanied by expansions into new habitats, facilitates diversification. We present a multi-gene phylogeny and age estimates for the ovenbird-woodcreeper family and use these… 

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