Convergent Evolution of Novel Protein Function in Shrew and Lizard Venom

@article{Aminetzach2009ConvergentEO,
  title={Convergent Evolution of Novel Protein Function in Shrew and Lizard Venom},
  author={Yael T. Aminetzach and John R. Srouji and Chung Yin Kong and Hopi E. Hoekstra},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={1925-1931}
}

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