Convergence vs. Specialization in the ear region of moles (mammalia)

@article{Crumpton2015ConvergenceVS,
  title={Convergence vs. Specialization in the ear region of moles (mammalia)},
  author={Nick Crumpton and Nikolay Kardjilov and Robert J. Asher},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2015},
  volume={276}
}
We investigated if and how the inner ear region undergoes similar adaptations in small, fossorial, insectivoran‐grade mammals, and found a variety of inner ear phenotypes. In our sample, afrotherian moles (Chrysochloridae) and the marsupial Notoryctes differ from most other burrowing mammals in their relatively short radii of semicircular canal curvature; chrysochlorids and fossorial talpids share a relatively long interampullar width. Chrysochlorids are unique in showing a highly coiled… Expand
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