Convergence of Nutritional Symbioses in Obligate Blood Feeders.

@article{Duron2020ConvergenceON,
  title={Convergence of Nutritional Symbioses in Obligate Blood Feeders.},
  author={Olivier Duron and Yuval Gottlieb},
  journal={Trends in parasitology},
  year={2020}
}

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