Convergence of Complex Cognitive Abilities in Cetaceans and Primates

@article{Marino2002ConvergenceOC,
  title={Convergence of Complex Cognitive Abilities in Cetaceans and Primates},
  author={Lori Marino},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={59},
  pages={21 - 32}
}
  • L. Marino
  • Published 19 June 2002
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Brain, Behavior and Evolution
What examples of convergence in higher-level complex cognitive characteristics exist in the animal kingdom? In this paper I will provide evidence that convergent intelligence has occurred in two distantly related mammalian taxa. One of these is the order Cetacea (dolphins, whales and porpoises) and the other is our own order Primates, and in particular the suborder anthropoid primates (monkeys, apes, and humans). Despite a deep evolutionary divergence, adaptation to physically dissimilar… 
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