Conundrums of a complex vector for invasive species control: a detailed examination of the horticultural industry

@article{Drew2010ConundrumsOA,
  title={Conundrums of a complex vector for invasive species control: a detailed examination of the horticultural industry},
  author={Jennifer Drew and Neil O. Anderson and David A. Andow},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2010},
  volume={12},
  pages={2837-2851}
}
Historically the horticultural industry has transformed the US landscape through intentional cultivar introductions and unintentional introductions of weeds, insects and plant diseases. While it has been demonstrated that the horticultural industry, in particular the ornamental subsector, is an important vector for the introduction and dispersal of invasive species, known invasive plants continue to be sold while new cultivars are introduced at an ever increasing rate. This study examines the… Expand

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