Controlling Eutrophication: Nitrogen and Phosphorus

@article{Conley2009ControllingEN,
  title={Controlling Eutrophication: Nitrogen and Phosphorus},
  author={Daniel J. Conley and Hans W. Paerl and Robert W. Howarth and Donald F. Boesch and Sybil P. Seitzinger and Karl E. Havens and Christiane Lancelot and Gene E. Likens},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={323},
  pages={1014 - 1015}
}
Improvements in the water quality of many freshwater and most coastal marine ecosystems requires reductions in both nitrogen and phosphorus inputs. 
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