Controlled high meat diets do not affect calcium retention or indices of bone status in healthy postmenopausal women.

@article{Roughead2003ControlledHM,
  title={Controlled high meat diets do not affect calcium retention or indices of bone status in healthy postmenopausal women.},
  author={Zamzam K Fariba Roughead and LuAnn K Johnson and Glenn I. Lykken and Janet R. Hunt},
  journal={The Journal of nutrition},
  year={2003},
  volume={133 4},
  pages={
          1020-6
        }
}
Calcium balance is decreased by an increased intake of purified proteins, although the effects of common dietary sources of protein (like meat) on calcium economy remain controversial. We compared the effects of several weeks of controlled high and low meat diets on body calcium retention, using sensitive radiotracer and whole body scintillation counting methodology. Healthy postmenopausal women (n = 15) consumed diets with similar calcium content (approximately 600 mg), but either low or high… 
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A reduced-energy diet supplying 1.kg(-1).d(-1) protein and 3 dairy servings increased urinary calcium excretion but provided improved calcium intake and attenuated bone loss over 4 mo of weight loss and 8 additionalMo of weight maintenance.
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